Lucero

Kickstand Productions Presents!

Sold Out: Lucero

Two Cow Garage

Sat, June 10, 2017

Doors: 9:30 pm / Show: 10:30 pm

Subterranean

This event is 21 and over

Lucero
Lucero
You could say we were one of the lucky ones, starting this band in April of '98 without a clue as to what we were doing. We were getting tired of the steady punk rock and metal diet and we wanted to try our hand at country songs, or do our best Tom Waits/Pogues impersonation.

The trick there was that we couldn't really play our instruments! I had never played guitar before and Ben Nichols (lead singer, guitar) had only played bass in other bands. Finding Roy Berry (drummer) and John C. Stubblefield (bassist) solidified the line up and being hidden away in Memphis allowed us to woodshed, experiment with different sounds and create one that was ours alone.

Eventually we got out of town, and playing 250 shows year not only made us tight as a band but as a family as well. We are still one of the few bands out there with the original line up from almost the beginning, and it shows.

Picking up Rick Steff on keys allowed us to expand the sound and grow musically. Being able to play whatever we could think up in our heads and having the music we loved and grew up on motivate and inspire us to try new things and take chances. We realized that if you added some horns to Ben's lyrics that it took it to the next step, from sad bastard country rock to soul and R&B and we realized we were a Memphis band and came by it honest. We have always brought Memphis with us wherever we went and this just proved it.

We came out screaming on 1372 Overton Park. Big sound, bigger horns – like a kid with a new toy we put them on everything and loved it! This record was a marked departure from the previous sound and announcement of way things we're gonna be now!
While 1372 Overton Park was written and the horns added after the fact, Women & Work was written with the horns in mind so it was a little less gung ho and was starting to settle in nicely. Women & Work is one of the best modern Southern rock records in my opinion and the song "On My Way Downtown" has almost surpassed "Tears Don't Matter Much" as the crowd favorite... almost!

This brings us to the new record. All A Man Should Do contains some of the most resonant lyrics Ben Nichols has ever written, lyrics that read like chapters from his life on the duality of relationships, getting older, finding where you want to be in this world, and musically we are broadening our sound. Working with producer Ted Hutt for a third time at the famous Ardent Studios, we felt comfortable enough to take some chances with a palette of new tones that sound understated yet powerful, bringing life to the stories behind the lyrics without overshadowing them.

It's also the first time we've ever put a cover song on a record, with a full band version of big star's "I Fell in Love with a Girl", and having Jody from Big Star sing back–up vocals makes it that more special and amazing. This is a Memphis record in the greatest sense and a perfect finish to the three–part love letter to a city that brought us up and made us what we are today.

"I was 15 years old in 1989. This record sounds like the record I wanted to make when I was 15. It just took 25 years of mistakes to get it done." — Ben Nichols

"Having Big Star actually sing on your cover of a Big Star song that you're recording at Ardent Studios – it doesn't get much more exciting than that." — Ben Nichols
Two Cow Garage
Two Cow Garage
In 2003, Two Cow Garage--the Columbus, Ohio-based three-piece featuring Micah Schnabel (vocals, guitar), Shane Sweeney (bass, vocals), and David Murphy (drums)--released their debut full-length, 0Please Turn the Gas Back On. The powerful rhythm and sweeping melody of the record’s opening track, “Been So Long”, has since given rise to four additional full-length releases, a handful of singles, and a few solo efforts. The band has paraded their brand of heart-wrenching, yet ferocious rock-n-roll, which calls to mind Nirvana, The Men, and Dinosaur, Jr. through countless North American tours as well as several European sojourns. Two Cow Garage’s 2010 release, Sweet Saint Me, not only garnered airplay on WXPN's World Café where it was showcased as a featured artist selection, but also found its way onto many critics’ best-of lists. The band has performed at numerous festivals including SXSW, CMJ, The Fest, Pouzza, and has toured with acts like The Hold Steady, Drag the River, Slobberbone, and Glossary.

September of 2013 will mark the release of TCG’s sixth studio album, The Death of the Self-Preservation Society. Anchored by the title track, as well as “My Friend Adam”, the record showcases the songwriting crafts of both frontman, Micah Schnabel, and bassist, Shane Sweeney. Recorded inside a 100 year-old barn in Eden, NY at HI/LO Studios, The Death of the Self-Preservation Society was produced by TCG and features a handful of guests, including members of Lansing, MI’s Cheap Girls. Opening with the guitar and drum storm that composes “Little Prince and Johnny Toxic”, the entire album is propelled by the line, “no one makes it out alive.” The band effectively and expertly channels its desperate, full-on stage presence within the confines of the release’s 12 tracks. The Death of the Self-Preservation Society pauses momentarily in the slow-burn reverb of “Mantle in ’56”, where Schnabel claims to “dream in punchlines and sweet tragedies.” It recoils quickly into a swirl of sonic landscape that gives both power and persona to the notion that “we are the only ones who can forgive ourselves.” Hard-fought and short-lived, this forgiveness is fueled by the fact that--as the title track states--“the house is on fire.” Thundering bass riffs, distorted guitars, and crisp drum tracks work nicely with a penchant for multi-instrumentalism that makes space for nicely-timed trumpet flourishes and well-situated piano and organ tones. This release proves to further the arc of the band’s development and blur the lines between rock, Americana, and punk.

As one of the most consistently-touring indie bands today, TCG continues to captivate audiences with live shows that serve up manic stage energy, gritty chord changes, and subtle lyric-mindedness. The band’s intense, fiery persona conjures authentic tunes that would be as at home in a Raymond Carver story as they are on a car stereo in the dead heat of an August, midwestern night.
Venue Information:
Subterranean
2011 W. North Ave.
Chicago, IL, 60647
http://subt.net/